Magical Drawing Show: Vanishing Taco on a Stick

Magical Drawing Show with Jessixa and Aaron Bagley
Part 2: Vanishing Taco on a Stick

Drawing is a magical and mysterious process. Drawing can help us unlock connections to creative ways of seeing the world around us and can help us explore big and small questions. Part of drawing’s magic is that it stirs the imagination; how you read a drawing (is it a rabbit? is it a duck?) sometimes depends on how you look at it. So, what if we approach drawing like a magic trick? To experiment with the magic of drawing, join Jessixa and Aaron Bagley in this 3-part show! Episodes focus on using simple shapes to build complicated drawings, dimensional drawing, and bringing a drawing to life using paper mechanics.

#MagicalDrawingShow #abracabyebye

ABOUT THE ARTISTS
Jessixa Bagley graduated from Cornish College of the Arts in 2004 with a BFA in painting and printmaking. Her artistic career has involved a mix of comics, fine art, and illustration. She has received numerous awards for her children’s literature and illustration including a 2016 Washington State Book Award for her picture book Boats for Papa and a 2018 Ezra Jack Keats Honor Award for Writing for her picture book Laundry Day. Many of her books are Junior Library Guild Selections. Jessixa brings experiences from her real life into her books and art to create fun, thoughtful, and authentic work. She lives in Seattle with her husband, Aaron Bagley, and son.

Aaron Bagley received his BFA from Cornish College of the Arts. Although trained as a fine artist, he has always been at heart a drawer; most of his work comes out of his sketchbook—comics, freelance work, last night’s dream, weirdos he sees on the bus. His illustrations and comics have been featured in The Stranger, The Seattle Review of Books, Drawn to Color (Sasquatch Books 2017), and Rocking Fatherhood (DeCapo Press 2016). The children’s book Vincent Comics Home, a collaboration with his spouse Jessixa Bagley, was published by Roaring Book Press in 2018, and they won the Emily Clark Balch Prize for Fiction for their story Anvil, which appeared in the fall 2019 issue of Virginia Quarterly Review.

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